Weather

The bridge, which is in the Piyan Mountain in the city of Longjing, China, lost huge chunks of its flooring during ferocious gusts of wind on Saturday afternoon

A man found himself desperately clinging to the side of a bridge more than 100 metre up in the air after gale force winds shattered the glass flooring.
An image of the terrifying incident was circulated on social media and authorities are now said to have launched an investigation.
The bridge, which is in the Piyan Mountain in the city of Longjing, China, lost huge chunks of its flooring during ferocious gusts of wind on Saturday afternoon.
Several pieces of glass were reportedly blown off by the winds which roared at speeds of up to 93 mph.
Local media reports that the male tourist, who has not been named, ‘crawled to safety’ after a rescue effort was launched by firefighters, police, and forestry and tourism staff.
The flooring collapsed during gale force winds
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The Strait Times reports that he is now receiving ‘psychological counselling’ after his terrifying ordeal.
An image of the stricken man was shared on social media website Sina Weibo, sparking a shocked reaction from many users.
One person said: “This is exactly why I dare not step on a bridge like that.”
Another asked: “”So many glass deck bridges have been built in recent years and are very popular with tourists. But how can we ensure their safety?”
The Piyan Mountain resort has reportedly now been closed after the incident.
The walkway is some 100m in the air
The Longjing city government was said to be carrying out a ‘comprehensive safety inspection’ of all tourist attractions, and an investigation into the case is under way.
Glass-bottomed bridges are popular in China and the country boasts two of the world’s longest and highest such bridge.
One is located in Hunan province and measures 426m in length (1,400ft) and 304m (1,000ft) in height.
Another, a 100m-long (3268ft) ‘bending’ bridge opened in the Zhejiang province in 2020 after first being unveiled in 2017.
The unique and equally terrifying design attracts more than 200,000 people each year.